help please

how do you tutor someone how to do basic intergers? oh, and bedmas (also known as pemdas in america i think)

so my best friend irl is… REALLY bad at math, she got 50% on her intergers quiz (and i helped her for a total of 3 hours)

i really want her to get a 90%+ average (thankfully the quiz is worth less than 1% of her final mark) but at this rate, it’s nearly impossible to teach her.

her test is in a week from now and she seriously needs help, so is there like an incredibly easy way to help her? ;o;

btw if it wasn’t obvious enough, canadians are known to be terrible in math.

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56 thoughts on “help please

  1. When you say integers do you mean like the adding ,subtracting, and stuff rules for them?
    For bedmas all I could recommend is memorizing what that stands for and whenever doing a problem writing the letters next to the problem and checking them as she does the problem

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    • I mean more adding and subtracting positive and negative numbers, she can easily multiply and divide.
      She already knows what each stands for but… Doesn’t understand how to follow the order. Like, I tell her many times to do brackets first but she always ends up adding. .___.

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      • she should write the letters next to the problem to remind her of what to do for the bedmas
        for adding a negative and a positive she could just turn it into a subtraction problem (ex. -5+8 could be 8-5 bc of commutative property)
        For subtracting positive and negative numbers she can turn it into an addition problem (ex. -7-8 can be -7+(-8) and she just adds the numbers as if they were positive and brings over the negative sign
        these are just little things that help me remember what to do sometimes
        hope it was sorta helpful .-.

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      • dude i think that will confuse her even more o_o
        I taught her how I learned it, and it was similar to your strategy. She ended up mixing adding and subtracting rules…
        all I can say is that she needs to understand the material to do it ;o;

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      • At school we used counters/chips to help us understand. Maybe that’ll help your friend
        or just draw plus signs and minus signs and show how they cancel out for addition
        and for subtraction of negatives show how the negative signs come together
        This could be helpful if your friend’s a visual learner

        Liked by 1 person

  2. For the integer part, I’d probably try explaining it to her with a number line or something so she has an idea, and then give her a question or two to make sure she understands it. If she still doesn’t understand it, you could try searching up a video online that quickly explains it.

    For the bedmas part, I would probably suggest that your friend memorizes what it means and then have her try a few problems with the letters on the side making sure she did it in the right order.

    Liked by 2 people

    • ohhh, number lines! that’s a good idea for intergers
      She already knows what it means, but always messes up the order. Like she does random things and i’m staring thinking “what are you doing”

      Liked by 2 people

      • I do tell her and ask her to fix the mistake afterwords ;w;
        y’know at this point i just realised that she’s probably a really slow learner, she probably needs like 10 times the amount of practise i needed

        Liked by 1 person

  3. show her a number line and a problem
    for example, 5+(-13)
    then put you finger or whatever at 5 and since you’re adding, face forward
    and since -13 is negative, walk backwards with your fingers and then what you land on is the answer
    so adding is facing forwards, subtracting is backwards
    negative numbers walk backwards, positive numbers walk forwards
    sorry I’m bad at explaining but this is how I finally understood integers

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    • don’t worry man I understand how to do math, I have really good grades in math XP
      It’s just to help my friend out
      alright, number lines should be useful! hopefully she’ll understand that way

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Not all Canadians :>
    Did you show her the tile method? Where you draw out the integers?
    You could also show her videos on how to do it if shes a visual learner.
    For bedmas…. Use IXL 😛
    Jk try and start her off with an easy problem. And once she understands that problem try and work her way up to math your grade.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. pemdas is Parentheses, exponents, multiplication or division, and addition and subtractions. I’m assuming she knows that, so moving on.
    You can remember pemdas (bemdas idek) by remembering the phrase Please Excuse My Dear Aunt Sally or Pigeons Evolve to Many Dead Angry Seahorses.
    For integers, I recently had a lesson.
    You should know about absolute value or whatever (which is the distance a number is from zero on a number line- they are never negative. For example, the absolute value of -8 is 8 because -8 is 8 spaces away from 0 on a number line). When subtracting integers, remember that subtracting is adding its opposite.
    For example, 27 (-) -7 would be 27 + 7 because you are adding 27 to the opposite of -7 (and the opposite of -7 is 7) and since 27 +7 = 34, 27 (-) 7=34.

    When adding integers, remember that positives make a positive and negatives make a negative. When you have numbers both positive and negative, whichever term has a greater absolute value (refer back to the definition of absolute value) will have the sign (and by sign I mean + or -) of the sum.
    Oh, god.
    That’s all the basic stuff so if you wanted more I’m too lazy.
    Sorry.
    Btw, your annaarso account’s password doesn’t work, i’ve been trying to tell you. Idk why, it worked before.

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  6. ok so im not that good with explaining integers but PEMDAS is really easy so idk what unit she’s in or what she’s learning but:
    P = parentheses
    E = exponents
    M = multiply
    D = divide
    A = add
    S = subtract
    basically you could tell her something like do them in the order they’re listed. for example:
    (3+1)^2 • 3 + 2
    like im sure you know this but i’m going to go through the steps and i think im right honestly im not that good at math :”(
    1) basically PEMDAS states that parentheses first so you would do (3+1) first which is 4
    2) next it says exponents so you’d do 4^2 which is 16
    and then it says multiply next so you’d do 16 • 2 as opposed to doing 3+2 before multiplying because addition and subtraction go last. so it’d be 32
    3) then you just add 32 + 2 = 34 :”‘)
    the equation was really easy though and a straight-up example equation but it kinda helps with what PEMDAS is there for

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    • we’re in the review unit, elementary school review. (so basically stuff we learned beforehand)
      She memorised bedmas (it’s basically pemdas, but brackets instead of parentheses)
      So when I practice with her usually she gets it with one or no errors
      but when she answers things alone she does it COMPLETELY WRONG like WOAHH MAN HOW YOU FORGET SUDDENLY (like she memorised the order but still fails)
      I guess she just needs practice. ;_;

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  7. ok
    you guys say bedmas (which i think is better than pemdas but im american so :v)
    TELL THE POOR CHILD
    YOU DO NOT ADD/SUBRACT FIRST WHEN IT COMES TO INTEGERS
    tell them they’ll win a prize if they manage to follow that (when in reality they won’t really pff)
    if they still don’t get it..
    ………just
    just give up
    there’s just no hope.
    so since bedmas has brackets first no duh obviously what are we 5
    i guess you force that in their head
    and remove the whole add/subract first stuff out of their head
    idk i can’t help i suck at explaining stuff ;>;

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  8. positive + positive = positive
    negative + negative = negative
    positive + negative / negative + positive = either
    if the positive is bigger, it’s basically positive – the negative as positive (7 + -3 // 7 – 3)
    literally thats all i can explain lol sorry

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  9. Pemdas, its order of operations. Integers are confusing to me a little. I think ive done a lesson on it back in september. Im sorry if im no help. Wait and you learned this in high school? Oh okay then. Im learning about geometry and algebra….uhh sorry i dont know how im supposed to help you… search online and watch tutorials?

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  10. It really depends on the type of learner she is. Like people said, try using a number line and lots of practice problems. Guide her through the problems to make sure she is doing it right. Possibly make up a different acronym to help her memorize the order?

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  11. I’m kinda surprised she’s learning this now; I learned integers in 4th grade… (Although I was [and still am] in a gifted program), but anyway.
    3 + 3 add, simple
    3 – 3 substract
    3 – -3 (three minus negative three) there are two lines, which make up an addition sign, so you add them; 3 – -3 = 3 + 3
    Just say that subtracting a positive number is like adding a negative number, and subtracting a negative number is adding a positive number.
    When you’re SUBTRACTING a NEGATIVE number, you’re subtracting the OPPOSITE of that number. You would be doing the OPPOSITE. I don’t like to think of it as “subtracting a negative from a positive,” but more “doing the opposite operation,” is an easier mindset.
    Hope she learns quickly. ;-; Bless Canada’s education…
    Right now we’re doing things like factoring polynomials I’ll just show you:
    Factor the polynomial using the perfect square trinomial case
    b^2 – 14b + 49
    (b – 7)(b -7)
    (b – 7)^2
    or something like that but way more complicated (using drawings and symbols I can’t type) I used to hate it so much but it got easier

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    • Oh, I know how to factor since 8th grade (long story), but apparently it’s grade 10 math. Most people switch from Academic (basically the level you need to take in order to get into university) to applied, because it’s “so hard” for most people. :L

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